Sandra Fluke and Barbara Johnson: Two Peas in a Pod

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Recently, two activists for sexual depravity have become media darlings. In both cases the Catholic Church was involved. In both cases the activist was professedly opposed to Catholic teaching and worked to advance a contrary agenda. In both cases they were portrayed by the media as victims. In both cases, their actual history as activists for their perverse causes is showing that they are not the innocent victims they make themselves appear to be, but provocateurs.

The Daily Caller has a rap sheet on Sandra Fluke, an Alinsky-syle activist with a “long history of feminist advocacy.” The Caller says that “Fluke entered Georgetown Law well aware that the school’s insurance plan did not cover contraception, only to spend the next three years lobbying the school to change its policy.” (Liberty’s Lifeline has a similar piece, with additional information.) Fluke thinks that she’s entitled to free contraception. As long as we’re pushing socialized “medicine,” I think anybody who listens to her (especially a politician) is entitled to a free full frontal lobotomy. The benefits to the citizenry would easily make the expense worth it.

Thomas Peters has the goods on Barbara Johnson, the Buddhist gay rights activist who made a stink after being denied Holy Communion for her admitted lesbianism, and who has said she will not be satisfied until Father Marcel Guarnizo is “removed from parish life.” Aside from her homosexuality, the woman is a non-Catholic, literally an apostate, and she complains about being denied Holy Communion and wants to get the priest fired.

When policies and procedures in the State — and, worse, even in the Church and Catholic institutions — can be impacted by the disingenuous and fraudulent testimony of such people, both societies have hit a low water mark.

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