Category: Theology

The proper object that theology studies is God. Theos is the Greek word for God. However, in this section are articles not only about God, but about the Faith and moral issues which constitute Church doctrine.   Certain articles that appear in this section also appear in other sections, such as that on the “Sacraments,” “Catechisis,” “Faith and Reason,” and “Heresies and Errors.”

Theology is a broad subject.  Candidates for the priesthood must complete four years of theology.  Theology is divided into natural, supernatural, and pastoral theology.  These, in turn, are divided into other related subjects.  Natural theology is the study of God as we can know Him by reason alone.  Supernatural theology is the study of the God as He revealed Himself to man, in scripture and tradition.  Pastoral theology is the study of God in His relation to the members of the Church, His body.  Sacramental theology would fall under this category. So would canon law, as part of ecclesiology, the study of the Church.

Other branches of theology are dogmatics, moral theology, biblical theology, and ascetical or mystical theology.

The Council of Ephesus

Editor’s Introduction: In the following pages, Brother Michael tells an inspiring story of the Christian enthusiasm with which the faithful of the fifth century fought and repelled a heresy that would have undermined faith in the Incarnation, and would have … Continue reading

The Church, The Mystical Body

(From a talk Brother gave at the 1997 St. Benedict Center Conference) I will begin this talk with a basic question, but a question I’m afraid most of us don’t think enough about: What was the purpose of the Incarnation?

Is Faith a Gift?

When Our Lord was asked: “Master, which is the great commandment in the law? He replied: “Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with thy whole heart, and with thy whole soul, and with thy whole mind.”

A Prelude to Faith

There is a certain definite behaviour of the human mind in reference to the Divine Mind constituting a function which Catholic Theology calls Faith. I am concerned with a critical analysis of that function.